Queen City Immigration Provides Visa Support for Real Deal Promotions Welterweight Tournament

Queen City Immigration Law

Combat Sports Practice

www.combatsportsvisas.com

704-500-2075

For Immediate Release -

Charlotte, NC, USA (March 19, 2018) –

Former Heavy Champion Evander Holyfield’s Real Deal Boxing, along with the World Boxing Council (“WBC”), announced that their organization will promote an eight man boxing competition in in the welterweight division. Queen City Immigration’s Combat Sports Practice will provide the immigration support for the tournament which begins on April 27 in Louisville, Kentucky.

The first round brackets are as follows:

#1 ranked FELIX DIAZ, (19-2-0, 9 KO’s) of Santa Domingo, D.R. will clash with #8 ranked DERRIECK CUEVAS, (16-0-1, 13 KO’s) of Catano, Puerto Rico.

#2 ranked CHRIS VAN HEERDEN, (25-2-1, 12 KO’s) of Johannesburg, South Africa, faces #7 ranked TIMO SCHWARZKOPF, (18-1-0, 10 KO’s) of Stuttgart, Germany.

#3 ranked FREDRICK LAWSON, (26-1-0, 21 KO’s) battles #6 ranked BAISHANBO NASIYWULA, (13-1-1, 6 KO’s), of Urumqi, China.

#4 ranked RADZHAB BUTAEV, (8-0-0, 6 KO’s) of Russia faces #5 ranked BRAD SOLOMON, (27-1-0, 9 KO’s), of Douglasville, Georgia.

The Queen City Immigration Law is excited to support the foreign born athletes competing in this tournament. “It is always an honor to work with a World Champion such,’ says Partner Sherrod Seward, practice leader of the Queen City Immigration’s Law’s Combat Sports section (“www.combatsportsvisas.com”). “Every athlete in this tournament has the skill set to take home everything, and that is what makes Real Deal Boxing special.”

Queen City Immigration Law specializes in O and P visas for athletes around the world and has a special practice group specifically for combat sports. Queen City Immigration Law is committed to acting as an innovator for improving the usefulness and effectiveness of P and O visa applications for boxers, mixed martial artists, and promotions that organize combat sports competitions.

ABOUT QUEEN CITY IMMIGRATION LAW

Queen City Immigration Law is a Charlotte, North Carolina-based full-service immigration law firm that focuses on the strategic needs of combat sports athletes and professionals all over the world. Our firm specializes in purposeful, intelligent and thorough representation in P and O visa categories for athletes, trainers, and coaches. We also advocate for combat sports business professionals with employment and investment based visa solutions.  For exceptional service to the community, we have attorneys and staff with fluency in French, Vietnamese, Spanish, and Polish languages. Other languages are easily accommodated upon request.

All our clients have to do to get started with the QCI Law P Visa Challenge is to visit http://www.qcilaw.com/athlete-p-1-form/ for athletes and http://www.qcilaw.com/promoterspackage for promoters. For more information, do not hesitate to call our offices at 704-500-2075.

Olympian boxer obtains P visa through Sponsorship by Management Company

For Immediate Release -

 

Charlotte, NC, USA (March 13, 2018) –

 

Charlotte based Queen City Immigration Law (“QCI Law”) is pleased to announce a successful P visa petition for Nigerian Olympian who will be making their professional debut soon in the United States. The olympian boxer obtained their visa through her management company which will last for more than two and a half  years and allow the olympian boxer to compete for multiple organizations on the same visa. This is very different from the typical pathway for a combat sports athlete to receive sponsorship from a combat sports promoter. Obtaining a P visa through a management contract rather than through a bout contract allows an combat sport athletes such as boxers, mixed martial artists, and jiu jitsu competitors to extend the length of their P visa and be available to compete with multiple organizations using the same P visa.

 

Partner, Sherrod Seward, the lead attorney on the case and practice manager for www.combatsportsvisas.com pressed the issue with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) to explain the unique needs and requirements of combat sports athletes to have extended an period of P visa status and the flexibility to compete for multiple organizations. “The life of a combat sports athlete, such as a mixed martial artist, boxer, or jiu jitsu athlete does not fit the mold of a typical extended P visa recipient such as an NBA basketball player ,” partner Sherrod Seward says. “We really had to drive the point home to USCIS that the managers of these athletes need time and the ability to work with multiple promotions to be successful.”

 

Driving the point to USCIS is an understatement, Sherrod and the team at Queen City Immigration Law overcame both an extensive request for evidence and a Notice of Intent to Deny to get the P visa approval for the olympian boxer. The work was well worth it as Queen City Immigration Law was able to identify, prepare for, and overcome all of the concerns of USCIS when it comes to managers sponsoring combat sports athletes such as boxers, mixed martial artists, and jiu jitsu athletes for years at a time.

 

About Queen City Immigration Law

 

Queen City Immigration Law is a Charlotte, North Carolina-based full-service immigration law firm that focuses on the strategic needs of combat sports athletes and professionals all over the world. Our firm specializes in purposeful, intelligent and thorough representation in P and O visa categories for athletes, trainers, and coaches. We also advocate for combat sports business professionals with employment and investment based visa solutions.  For exceptional service to the community, we have attorneys and staff with fluency in French, Vietnamese, Spanish, and Polish languages. Other languages are easily accommodated upon request.

 

All our clients have to do to get started with the QCI Law P Visa Challenge is to visit http://www.qcilaw.com/athlete-p-1-form/ for athletes and http://www.qcilaw.com/promoterspackage for promoters. For more information, do not hesitate to call our offices at 704-500-2075.

Immigration for Martial Artists including Jiu-Jitsu, Combat Sambo, and Wrestling Practitioners

bjj11.jpg

Call 704-500-2075 for a Consultation

 

There are record numbers of martial artists such as brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Karate, Combat Sambo, and Wrestling athletes who are seeking to come to the United States. With the rise of mixed sports competitions such as mixed martial arts, combat jujitsu, pankration,  and others, there are more opportunities for international combat sports athletes to compete and coach in the United States. This is especially true with the sport of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu which is rapidly increasing in popularity and  the number of available competitions such as the IBJJF, Mundials, and Pan American competitions.

Unfortunately, there is an increasing trend for martial artists and combat sports athletes to have their visas denied when applying for the B visitor visas. There are many possible reasons to have a visitor visas denied such as the petitioner not having enough ties back to the the their home country, previous immigration violations, and overstaying on a  previous visa. In addition, for athletes such as brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners, mixed martial artists, boxers, and other combat sports athletes that compete for prize money, there can be denials for getting compensated without proper work authorization. This is pretty easy for immigration officers to find out for sports that are regulated by a state commission such as boxing, mixed martial arts, and professional wrestling. State athletic commissions who regulate these competitions typically post how much each athlete was paid on public forum. USCIS can easily find this information out from the records of the athletic commissions and look and deny the visa.

When coming to the United States on a B visitor visa, the athlete is not permitted to do the following:

  1. receive payment as a referee or official for any tournaments or competitions

  2. receive payments for private lessons

  3. teach or coach at a gym full-time or even as a seminar

  4. compete for monetary or in-kind compensation

Are you receiving payments as a referee for a local jiu-jitsu tournament? Not allowed. Are you teaching seminars at a local jiu-jitsu gym for a seminar fee? Not allowed. Are you giving private training sessions at a local jiu-jitsu gym for cash? Just say NO!

To avoid having this issue happen in the future. It is imperative that these athletes seek a P visa which comes with work authorization for a specific purpose such as competing and coaching.  

 

The P-1 visa can be broadly applied to various classes of entertainers, including fighters, however the actual application can be quite nuanced. The application must include carefully prepared explanations concerning the terms of the employment opportunity, complete with supporting documents in order to be approved. Our attorneys are savvy to include specific information related to the athlete's industry which can include employment contracts,  bout agreements, obtaining the appropriate consultation letters, and circumstances that are unique to combat sports.

 

Below are the steps for obtaining the P visa:

#1 SPONSOR OR AGENT IN THE U.S.  

The P-1 Visa must begin with a Petitioner in the United States that wishes to engage the athlete for either a bout, training, or for management purposes. The petitioner must be one of the following:

1. A U.S. Employer (Promotion or Training Center) - Requires written contract with dates and wages

2. U.S. Sponsoring Organization (A Major Sports League) - Requires written contract with dates and wages

3. U.S. Agent/Manager (A U.S. Person representing a fighter) - Requires written contract with dates, training schedule,  possible performance opportunities, payment arrangements, hours of working, and fringe benefits

4. Foreign Employer through a U.S. Agent - Same as 3. U.S. Agent/Manager but the foreign employer uses a U.S. person as a conduit.

Note Regarding Support Staff - P-1S:  Essential support personnel cannot be included on the P-1 petition filed for principal athletes or members of an athletic team. A separate petition needs to be filed for such qualified essential support personnel seeking a P-1 Essential Support Personnel visa classification

#2 INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

The individual athlete must be an internationally recognized athlete based on his or her own reputation and achievements as an individual. He or she must demonstrate a degree of skill and recognition substantially above that ordinarily encountered so that the achievement is renowned, leading or well known in more than one country. For a fighter, this includes official competition record, amateur record, any titles won, media coverage, expert opinions from industry insiders.

#3 WRITTEN CONSULTATION FOR LABOR UNION

With few exceptions, it is mandatory to submit a written consultation from an appropriate labor organization along with the P-1 Petition. A written consultation must come from an authorized official labor organization that represents the athlete's peers in the United States. The written consultation must either be an advisory opinion that the athlete's participation does not affect the local workforce or that the organization has no objection to the the approval of the P-1 visa petition. It is on the burden of the petitioner to establish that an appropriate labor organization does not exist, if that is the case.

#4 PROOF OF FOREIGN RESIDENCE

Each athlete and support personnel must submit evidence that shows they have a permanent residence in a foreign country and no intention of abandoning that residence. Supporting evidence includes home ownership or rental agreements, utility and other bills, ownership of valuable assets,  dependents, and other ties to the foreign country.

#5 ADMISSION INTO THE USA

If the athlete is already in the U.S. on a visa, for example a B-1 Visitor visa, then the petitioner may remain in the U.S. while the P petition is being adjudicated. If the athlete is not in the U.S. while the P petition is being adjudicated, then the application will be processed by an Embassy or Consulate outside the U.S. The athlete will have to retrieve the visa from the Embassy or Consulate before coming to the U.S.

#6 P-4 FOR SPOUSES AND CHILDREN

The P-4 Visa is available to the spouse and unmarried children under 21 of both P-1 Athletes and P-1S Support Personnel. The P-4 Visa is usually limited to the same period of time as the corresponding P-1 or P-1S application. The P-4 Support Personnel are not permitted to accept payment but may attend school or college.

#5 EXTENSIONS AND CHANGES

The original P-1 petition can be authorized for up to 5 years as long as the business or activity that supports the petition continues. After 5 years,  the petition may be extended for up to an additional 5 years for Athletes. The P-1S petition for supporting personnel can be authorized for up to 1 year. After one year, the visa may be extended in increments of one year for up to 10 years. After, completing an extension period for the visa, the athlete or support personnel must return home and obtain the next visa at the consular office.

The P-1 athlete is only supposed to work for the entity that sponsored the P-1 visa petition. In certain circumstances such as a bout, the P-1 athlete may not have to obtain an additional P-1. It is best to consult with an attorney before making decision to compete for another organization while sponsored for a P-1 with another entity such as a manager. If, P-1 makes a substantial change in employment, it is necessary to file a new petition for the new employment arrangement.  

Note: In the case of professional P-1 athletes who are traded from one organization to another, employment authorization for the player will automatically continue for a period of 30 days after acquisition by the new organization, within which time the new organization is expected to file a new P-1 petition. If the new petition is not filed within 30 days, employment authorization will cease. If the new petition is filed within 30 days, the professional athlete shall be deemed to be in valid P-1 status, and employment shall continue to be authorized, until the petition is adjudicated. If the new petition is denied, employment authorization will cease.

#6 GOVERNMENT FEES AND APPLICATION TIMING

The typical P-1 Visa application takes about a month to be processed and costs $460 in Government fees.

There is premium processing available for the P-1 Visa. Premium processing costs an additional $1225 and requires the USCIS to make a decision within 15 business days.

CombatSportsVisas.com Presents 2018 Promoter's Package - WE GET PAID WHEN THEY GET HERE.

2018 Promo Kit - For Combat Sports.png

Queen City Immigration Law

222 S. Church St

Suite 100

Charlotte, North Carolina 28202

Tel:     704.500.2075

Web:    www.combatsportsvisas.com

Email:    combatsportsvisas@qcilaw.com

 

18th January 2018

 

For Immediate Release

P VISA CHALLENGE FOR COMBAT SPORTS PROMOTERS - WE GET PAID WHEN THEY GET HERE!

With great excitement and optimism, we are proud to announce that Queen City Immigration Law's Combat Sports Practice presents the 2018 Promoter's Package for P visas. For the past 27 years, P and O visas have given foreigners within the entertainment and athletic industries the opportunity to provide their services within the United States. Now, Queen City Immigration Law (QCIL), will provide unique and tailored services just for promoters of combat sport related events to hire talent from all over the world. To build rapport with the combat sports related promotion community, we are offering a program which legal fees are due when athletes arrived to the United States. 

“Combat Sports Promotions are consistently some of the most active organizations that require participation from all over the world,” partner, Sherrod Seward says. “having a background in the business of combat sports gives me a unique perspective on how to be helpful to promotions.”

Partner, Sherrod Seward, has been involved with combat sports since matriculating in Law School and has made it his mission to be a resource for the combat sports industry.  Sherrod leads our entertainment and cultural based visa group and has performed research on MMA broadcasting agreements, performed business development for top regional promotions, and assisted in the management of some of the world’s best fighters.

The Combat Sports Promotion Package is a program that allows QCIL to integrate seamlessly with combat sports related organizations in a manner that increases efficiency and reduces costs. 

Try the Online Platform!

Visit this link - www.qcilaw.com/yourpromotion

Password: testing

Promoter's Kit - For Combat Sports.png

For more information about how the Promoter Package can help you and your organization to obtain P visas, please contact us at 704-500-2075 or via email at combatsportsvisas@qcilaw.com.

P VISAS THAT LAST! The Challenge to Boxers, Martial Artists, and Managers

QCI Law - Press Kit - For Combat Sports.png

 

Many of the best performers and athletes in the world are not from the United States, but in order for them to work in the US it is some necessary legal steps because the consequences are steep. Also, with proper preparation,  P visa benefits can last for years. 

 Queen City Immigration Law is an immigration based law firm set to help ease the process for you and your athletes. Our job is to take the stress of obtaining a p visa away and allow managers and athletes time to focus on more important things such as obtaining sponsorship, training and winning competitions! 

Our law firm focuses on the strategic needs of artists, actors, performers, and entertainment professionals all over the world. Our firm specializes in purposeful, intelligent and thorough representation in P and O visa categories.  In case you are unfamiliar, P & O visas are necessary for foreign performers and athletes who are being compensated to perform in the United States.

One of the main reasons a P visa can be stressful is the cost for obtaining one. That’s where we want to help the most with our P Visa Challenge.

THE CHALLENGE IS SIMPLE

We challenge our first time clients to try CrowdJustice to raise money for their P visa application and if they are unsuccessful in obtaining their goal, we will service their next two P visa applications at 50% of our legal fees.

What  is CrowdJustice?

CrowdJustice is a crowdfunding platform uniquely tailored for legal projects and is represents valuable tool that will help build a strong set of resources for many of our clients' visa cases.

Follow the steps below to get started today:

1. Register with CrowdJustice: Applying the crowdfunding model to the law is an ideal solution for clients who have a story to tell and need resources to assert their rights and/or seek legal relief. This is especially true for entertainment clients that have a fan base and/or sponsors. Here is the link https://www.crowdjustice.com/get-started/

2. Accept the P Visa Challenge https://www.qcilaw.com/pvisachallenge

We challenge our first-time clients to try CrowdJustice to raise money for their P visa application and if they are unsuccessful in obtaining their goal, we will service their next P visa application at 50% off our legal fees.

All our clients have to do to get started with the QCI Law P Visa Challenge is to visit www.qcilaw.com/pvisachallenge and click accept challenge.

Managers & Promoters: P visas CAN last for years!

http://www.qcilaw.com/entertainment-blog/2017/9/23/getting-the-most-out-of-your-p-visa

5 Reasons not to avoid a P visa and 4 Ways to Fund them

The reality is that P Visas are an expensive endeavor for many athletes and coaches looking to compete in the United States. Especially up and coming athletes who do not receive a large amount of compensation for their competitions... yet. The reality is also that P Visas are necessary to compete the RIGHT WAY and there are SERIOUS consequences to competing on visitor visas and getting paid.

Being sensitive to the needs of athletes, our law firm's goal is the make the P Visa work for the athlete in a manner that is thorough and cost effective. In fact, in many cases, our law firm reserves collection of some of the legal fees until the visa is approved.

While many athletes find it tempting to compete on a visitor visa due to the cost of obtaining a P visa, there are serious reasons to do things the right way:

1. It is the law of the land

USCIS requires that most artists and athletes that come to the United States and receive compensation must obtain a P Visa. A Visitor B1/B2 Visa is not appropriate because it is unlawful to receive compensation while on a Visitor Visa. 

2. Too many athletes are getting caught

Many fighters are starting to pay the price for competing on Visitor Visas. One reason is because it is not hard to track. When anyone comes to the United States on a Visitor Visa, notes are logged with consular offices and USCIS. Typically if an athlete competes in a sanctioned competition there will be a paper trail of payment that is easily obtained by government officials.

3. Waivers are hard to get

Criminal records and immigration violations can lead to the denial of P Visa applications. In these instances waivers may be available to continue with the process but can be expensive to prepare and not always granted. Fortunately, our law firm does handle P Visa waivers for athletes but it is best to avoid needing one in the first place. 

4. P-visas can last a long time when prepared correctly

For a competition, a P Visa will typically only be granted for a couple of months. However, a properly explained and prepared P Visa for an employment contract can last for years. The employment contract can be for management, coaching, participating as a paid training partner at a gym, or other purposes. 

5. Could cause problems later

Once you get caught competing and getting paid for it without a P Visa, you will have problems. It may not happen the first time or the second time, but the likelihood is high under the current administration. While waivers are available, they are not a guarantee. The best practice is just to do it correctly in the first place by obtaining the P Visa. 

HELP WITH FUNDING P VISA APPLICATION

The good news is that there are ways to mitigate the expense of obtaining the P visa or getting creative in how to fund the process. Remember that the athlete's participation in the competition is not just to the benefit of the athlete but also other parties as well such as competitors, event promoters,  sponsors, and fans. 

1. Base the P Visa on an employment opportunity rather than just a single bout

This is simple. P Visa for a single competition only lasts for a couple months while an employment opportunity can last years. 

2. Do not forget to use the P visa as a bargaining chip when negotiation a competition agreement

Do not hesitate to bring up the costs of the P Visa to event promoters and your competitors. There are countless instances with foreign athletes are brought in to compete because they are the only ones that will take the opportunity. This can be used to the advantage of the foreign athlete. 

3. Consider finding a sponsor to pay for the cost of the Visa

There are many companies around the world, not just in the United States, that support athletes endeavors through sponsorship. Sometimes, coming to them with the request of paying for a specific expense is easier that a than general request. 

4. Use Crowd Justice to work with your network and story to raise money for the cost of Visa

CrowdJustice's mission is to ensure everyone has access to the legal system, not just those who can afford it at the time. Applying the crowdfunding model to the law is an ideal solution for clients who have a story to tell and need resources to assert their rights and/or seek legal relief.

All our clients have to do to get started on CrowdJustice is visit https://www.crowdjustice.com/get-started/ and mention Queen City Immigration Law.

Thank you for your interest and we look forward to working for you. To continue with the process please visit the appropriate in-take form.

Athletes In-Take Form

Coaches In-Take Form

 

 

CombatSportsVisas.com affiliates with CrowdJustice to Help Fighters!

CombatSportsVisas.com affiliates with CrowdJustice to Help Fighters!

Charlotte, NC (August 3, 2017) – Charlotte based Seward Tran LLP d/b/a Queen City Immigration Law is pleased to announce its affiliation with CrowdJustice, a crowdfunding platform uniquely tailored for litigation and legal projects. CrowdJustice represents a valuable tool that will help build a strong set of resources for many of our clients' legal cases.

CrowdJustice's mission is to ensure everyone has access to the legal system, not just those who can afford it at the time. Applying the crowdfunding model to the law is an ideal solution for clients who have a story to tell and need resources to assert their rights and/or seek legal relief.

“Our relationship with CrowdJustice is an unbelievable resource for our clients that need assistance raising funds for their cases,” said Sherrod Seward, Partner at Queen City Immigration Law. “CrowdJustice works directly with our clients to craft a webpage on its crowdfunding site to share their story with their support system and generous donors.”

Criminal Waivers for Athletes and Entertainers seeking P Visas

Criminal Waivers for Athletes and Entertainers seeking P Visas

There is a common misconception that having a criminal past, including felony convictions, will prevent a potential boxer, mixed martial artist, or other combat sport participant from obtaining a P Visa or an O Visa. While this is absolutely true for a person looking to migrate to the United States, this is not necessarily true for someone looking to come to the United States on a temporary basis without intent to stick around. If you are a fighter or a coach that has made mistakes in the past, it could very well be worth taking the time and expense of applying for a waiver to open up the doors and opportunity to perform your craft in the United States. 

Sculpting Manager/Fighter Agreements for P Visa Consultations

Sculpting Manager/Fighter Agreements for P Visa Consultations

Knowing how to take advantage of the P Visa through a management perspective can extend the fighter’s benefits from the visas for up to 5 years. However, obtaining the full term possible for the visa is based on having a well prepared agreement in place to explain to United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (‘USCIS”) is necessary to achieve the benefit. The most common way, and easier way, for fighters and coaches to obtain P Visas to base their petition on a bout agreement. This is a great way to obtain the visas because the purpose and itinerary is easily comprehended by USCIS and Consular Officers; unfortunately, the trend is that these visas are only being granted for 3 months. Three months is a short amount of time for a fighter that is looking to work in more training and fight multiple bouts while in the United States.

Introducing Combat Sports Immigration Practice Group - Queen City Immigration Law

Introducing Combat Sports Immigration Practice Group - Queen City Immigration Law

We are pleased to announce the expansion of our services to include a special practice group for Combat Sports related Visas. Partner, Sherrod Seward, has been involved with combat sports since matriculating in Law School and has made it his mission to be a resource for the combat sports industry.  Sherrod leads our entertainment and cultural based visa group and has performed research on MMA broadcasting agreements, performed business development for top regional promotions, and assisted in the management of some of the world’s best fighters.

A Haiku for the Fight of the Century - McGregor vs Mayweather

A Haiku for the Fight of the Century - McGregor vs Mayweather

A few months ago, I put a lot of though into the likelihood that this fight would happen. Ultimately, my analysis concluded that this fight absolutely should not happen but there is so much money at stake and no other similar payday on the horizon that it will get done. An ode to the God of Commerce. I am giving myself permission to be excited about this fight because of my curiosity in the stylistic match up and an honest belief that no one will get seriously hurt.