fbq('track', 'ViewContent');

Queen City Immigration Law Armed Services Advocacy Frequently Asked Questions

Queen City Immigration Law strives to be a reliable and responsive resource for members of the U.S. Armed Forces and their families stationed in the United States and all over the world. U.S. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services established a military assistance team to ensure that the military community receives quick and secure access to accurate information. Below is a list of answers to frequently asked questions received by prepared by the USCIS military assistance team. 

Adjustments

Q.  I am in the military and want to file an I-130 on behalf of my spouse or child. What evidence do I need to provide?

A. You must provide specific information to establish the bona fides of the relationship between you, the petitioner, and your spouse or child.  You will need to provide evidence of the claimed relationship:

  • If you are filing the petition on behalf of an alien spouse, evidence establishing a bona fide marriage between you and the alien
  • If you are filing the petition on behalf of an alien child, evidence establishing a parent-child relationship between you and the child

Military-specific evidence can be deemed as strong evidence towards the bona fides of the marriage.  Such evidence may include but is not limited to the following: 

  • All pages of the service member’s Form DD-1172, “Application for Uniformed Services Identification Card DEERS Enrollment,” naming dependents 
  • Dependent’s Military Identification and Privilege Card
  • Form DD-1278, “Certificate of Overseas Assignment to Support Application to File Petition for Naturalization” 
  • Copy of Permanent Change of Station (PCS) orders issued to the service member for permanent tour of duty overseas that specifically name the spouse or child
  • Designation of the beneficiary on the military members’ Group Life Insurance (SGLI) policy
  • Documentation showing that the spouse and/or child resides in military base/post housing
  • Living will and/or last will and testament

Q.  I am a conditional resident alien residing abroad with my military member spouse.  Where should I file the Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence (Form I-751)?

A. File your Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence (Form I-751) with the applicable USCIS Service Center based on your state of residence in the United States (see I-751 filing instructions). In addition to submitting the required evidence outlined in the form instructions, the petition must be accompanied by evidence of your military spouse’s overseas assignment, such as a photocopy of the official orders or a letter from your spouse’s commanding officer that states that you are authorized to reside abroad with the military member.

Q.  My spouse is in the military and stationed or deployed abroad.  Will USCIS accept the Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence (Form I-751) without my spouse’s (the petitioner’s) signature?

A. Yes.  USCIS will accept the Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence (Form I-751) without the petitioner’s signature if it is accompanied by the required evidence outlined in the form instructions along with evidence of the military member’s assignment abroad, such as a photocopy of the official orders or a letter from the military member’s commanding officer.  Contact the Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) to notify USCIS when you return to the U.S.

Q.  I am a conditional resident alien and a military member stationed or deployed abroad.  My conditional resident status will expire prior to my return to the United States.  Can my spouse file the Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence (Form I-751) without my signature?

A. Yes.  USCIS will accept Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence (Form I-751) without the beneficiary’s signature if it is signed by the petitioner spouse and accompanied by the required evidence outlined in the form instructions along with evidence of the military member’s assignment abroad, such as a photocopy of the official orders or a letter from the commanding officer that states that he or she is authorized to reside abroad. Contact the Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) to notify USCIS when you return to the U.S.

Q.  I am a military member stationed abroad with my dependents.  Can my dependents have their interviews for the Petition to Remove the Conditions on Residence (Form I-751) conducted overseas?

A. No.  The interviews for Form I-751 are only conducted domestically.  In many cases where the appropriate evidence is submitted as outlined in the form instructions, an interview may not be required.  If you and your dependents are stationed abroad and USCIS determines that an interview is required, USCIS will place the case on “overseas hold” until your dependents are available for an interview at a domestic USCIS office.  Contact the Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) to notify USCIS when you return to the U.S. 

Q.  I am a military member and I received an Approval Notice for my Petition for Alien Relative (Form I-130) filed on behalf of my spouse or family member. What is the next step? 

A. The Department of State’s National Visa Center will provide instructions on what you will need to do to obtain a visa.  Please visit the Department of State website at http://travel.state.gov/visa/ for more information. 

Naturalization and Citizenship

Q.   I am a military naturalization applicant.  When am I permitted to file my Application for Naturalization (Form N-400)?

A.   If you are applying for naturalization under Section 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (naturalization through U.S. military service during a designated period of hostility), you may file the Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) once you have completed one day of honorable service on active duty or in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve.  In most cases, the earliest you can submit your application is during basic training.  Individuals in the Delayed Entry Program (DEP) are typically not eligible to apply. 

If you are applying for naturalization under Section 328 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (naturalization with one year or more of U.S. military service), you may file the Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) as soon as you become a Lawful Permanent Resident and have completed one year of honorable military service. 

USCIS will reject applications filed before you meet eligibility, which will delay the processing of your application. 

Q.  I filed an Application for Naturalization (Form N-400), based on qualifying military service and am required to submit Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service (Form N-426).  How do I fulfill this requirement?

A. Many military installations have a designated USCIS liaison to help you with the application process and certify your Form N-426, Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service.  Ask your chain of command for the contact information for this person.  Your installation’s personnel or legal office may also be able to assist you. 

If you have separated from the military and no longer have access to a USCIS liaison, you have the following options:

Option 1. USCIS will accept Form N-426 uncertified if you complete the form and submit with a photocopy of your DD-214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty. The photocopy of your DD-214 must include all dates of military service listed on Form N-426 as well as identify your type of separation and character of service (this information is found on page “Member-4”.)

Option 2. If you are unable to submit a photocopy of your DD Form 214, you can contact your branch of service’s military personnel records center. You can obtain this information from Standard Form 180, www.archives.gov/research/order/standard-form-180.pdf

 

, or the U.S. Armed Forces Legal Assistance Locator, http://legalassistance.law.af.mil/content/locator.php.  

Q.  I am separated from the military and want to apply for naturalization based on my military service.  Does my discharge type (character of service) matter for naturalization eligibility? 

A.  Yes.  You must have received an Honorable or General Under Honorable Conditions discharge in order to be eligible for naturalization under the military provisions, section 328 or 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). 

Q.  What is the fee for the Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) filed by spouses of military members?

A.  There is no fee for a current or former military member to file an Application for Naturalization (Form N-400)

 

.  The fee for non-military members (including military family members) for the Application for Naturalization is $680 (which includes a biometrics fee of $85).  Individuals who reside abroad at the time of filing the naturalization application are not required to pay the biometrics fee.  Military family members filing a naturalization application from within the United States should submit a single check or money order of $680 made payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Military family members filing a naturalization application from abroad should submit a single check or money order of $595, made payable to U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

A family member applicant may apply for a fee waiver based on economic need (income below the poverty guidelines, see Form I-864 for details on poverty guidelines) and may use Form I-912 to apply for Fee Waiver.

Q. I recently enlisted in the military and am not a citizen.  How can I apply for naturalization while in basic training?  

A. Bring your completed Application for Naturalization (Form N-400)

 

 and a Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service (Form N-426)

 

 with you to basic training.  Depending on your branch of service and unit, you may have the opportunity to submit your application packet, have your naturalization interview, and take the Oath of Allegiance to become a U.S. citizen before you graduate from basic training.  Keep in mind that this initiative is not yet available at all military installations – check with your recruiter or basic training instructor to see if your training site participates.  Refer to the USCIS Document Checklist (M-477)

 

 for a list of documents that you may need to submit with your application packet.  

Q.  My Application for Naturalization was denied, and I would like to appeal the decision.  How can I do so?  Is there a fee?

A.  You may file Form N-336, Request for a Hearing on a Decision in Naturalization Proceedings (Under Section 336 of the INA)

 

, with the local field office.  Effective November 23, 2010, there is no fee for Form N-336 if filed by an applicant who has filed an Application for Naturalization under sections 328 or 329 of the INA (i.e., who is a member or veteran of any branch of the United States Armed Forces) and whose application has been denied.

Q.  I derived citizenship through my parent, but would like to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship. How can I do so? Is there a fee?

A.  You must file the Application for Certificate of Citizenship (Form N-600)

 

.  There is no fee for Form N-600 when filed by a member or veteran of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. The member or veteran must attach proof of service; otherwise USCIS will charge a fee to file the Form N-600.

Q.  I am a military member stationed abroad with my dependents.  Can my dependents have their naturalization interviews conducted overseas?

A. Yes.  Certain spouses or children of service members residing abroad with that service member (as authorized by official orders) may be eligible to become naturalized citizens without having to travel to the United States for any part of the naturalization process.  Please see “Fact Sheet:  Requirements for Naturalization Abroad by Spouses of Members of the U.S. Armed Forces” and “Overseas Naturalization Eligibility for Certain Children of U.S. Armed Forces Members” onwww.uscis.gov/military for more information.

If you have an appointment for a naturalization interview and you have transferred overseas, contact USCIS by calling the Military Help Line by telephone:  1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) or email:  militaryinfo.nsc@dhs.gov and request to have your case transferred to your nearest USCIS overseas office.

 

Submitting Biometrics

Q.  I am an active duty military member and am required to submit biometrics at a USCIS Application Support Center (ASC). Do I need an appointment?

A. No.  Active duty military members do not need an appointment and will be accepted on a walk-in basis at any ASC in the United States.  You should bring your military ID with you to the ASC. 

Q. Can I submit fingerprints before I file the Application for Naturalization (Form N-400)?

A. Yes.  You may submit fingerprints even if you have not yet submitted an Application for Naturalization. 

Q.  Where can military members or dependents that are living abroad go to have the fingerprints taken?

A. Military members and dependents stationed abroad can submit 2 properly completed FD-258 Fingerprint Cards taken by the Military Police, Department of Homeland Security officials or U.S. Embassy or Consulate officials. 

Q. If my military installation does not use FD-258, can I submit another type of fingerprint document instead?

A. FD-258 is the preferred document used to submit fingerprint, however USCIS may be able to accept a comparable document, such as the Department of Defense SF-87, in place of the FD-258.  Please contact the USCIS Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) for more information.

General Information

Q.  What are the criteria to have an application or petition expedited for military personnel?

A.  USCIS reviews all expedite requests on a case-by-case basis. Some examples of situations that may qualify for expedited processing include:

  • Pending military deployment
  • Extreme emergent situation
  • Humanitarian situation

Please contact your local USCIS office or the USCIS Military Help Line at 1 877 CIS 4MIL (1-877-247-4645) for more information.

Q.  I am an active duty military member stationed abroad.  How do I check the status of my application?

A. You can check their status of any application by clicking on the “Check My Case Status” link on the right-hand side of this page. Note: when checking the status of an I-751, you must use the receipt number from the ASC appointment notice. You may also call the USCIS Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645).

Q. I am scheduled to deploy in the near future.  How do I notify USCIS?

A. If you have not yet submitted an application or petition to USCIS, write in bold letters, “I have an upcoming deployment” on the first page of the application/petition, or on a cover sheet attached to your application. If you have already submitted your application and need to notify USCIS of an upcoming deployment, contact the USCIS Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) as soon as possible. 

Family Members

Q.  My child was born overseas while I was residing abroad on military orders.  Is my child a United States Citizen?

A.  In most cases, children born abroad to a U.S. citizen military parent acquire U.S. citizenship at birth.  To be sure, as soon as possible after the birth, you will need to contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.  If the consulate determines that the child has acquired U.S. citizenship, a consular officer prepares a Consular Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States of America (Form FS-240). This document serves as proof of U.S. citizenship, and it is acceptable evidence of citizenship for obtaining a passport, entering school, and other purposes. 

Q. I want to adopt a child while I am stationed abroad.  Is this possible?

A. Yes, you may go through the adoption process while you are stationed abroad.  Visit www.uscis.gov/adoptions and the State Department adoption website at http://adoption.state.govfor more information.  You may also email the USCIS National Benefits Center at NBC.adoptions@dhs.gov.  Please note that there are no special adoption processes or special provisions available to military families.   The requirements for each of the three different types of adoption cases (Hague adoptions, Orphan adoptions, and Other adoptions) are discussed at www.uscis.gov/adoptions

Also visit www.uscis.gov and click on the link for “Before Your Child Immigrates to the United States” for more information about U.S. citizenship for your child after adoption.  If you are a military member stationed abroad, visit the Form N-600K page under the “Forms” link and the “Biological or Adopted Children Residing Outside the United States” page for information about obtaining U.S. citizenship for your child after adoption.   

Q. Are there any benefits for surviving relatives of service members who died while serving on active duty? 

A. Yes. Please visit the link to “M-601, Survivor Benefits for Non-Citizen Relatives of Military Personnel” located at www.uscis.gov/military for benefit information for surviving family members. 

Other Information

Q.  What are the criteria to have an application or petition expedited for military personnel?

A.  USCIS reviews all expedite requests on a case-by-case basis. Some examples of situations that may qualify for expedited processing include:

  • Pending military deployment 
  • Extreme emergent situation 
  • Humanitarian situation

Please contact your local USCIS office or the USCIS Military Help Line at 1 877 CIS 4MIL (1-877-247-4645) for more information.

Q. I am scheduled to deploy in the near future.  How do I notify USCIS?

A. If you have not yet submitted an application or petition to USCIS, write in bold letters, “I have an upcoming deployment” on the first page of the application/petition, or on a cover sheet attached to your application. If you have already submitted your application and need to notify USCIS of an upcoming deployment, contact the USCIS Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1 877 247 4645) as soon as possible.

Q. I am serving abroad on active duty.  How do I notify USCIS of my new address?

A.  Members of the military can notify USCIS of their new address by contacting the Military Help Line by e-mail: militaryinfo.nsc@dhs.gov, or telephone: 1 877 247-4645.  You may also go to www.uscis.gov and complete the AR-11 online to change your address. It is important to notify USCIS every time your address changes so that you will continue to receive information and correspondence about your immigration status.

If are stationed in the U.S., you can also change your address with your local USCIS office by making an Infopass appointment through the USCIS website at http://infopass.uscis.gov/

Q.  Where can military members or family members that are living abroad submit fingerprints?

A.  Some applicants may not need to submit fingerprints if USCIS already has fingerprints on file that the applicant submitted for another USCIS application.  If no fingerprints are on file and the applicant is a military member, USCIS may be able to obtain and use fingerprints captured when the military member enlisted.  If USCIS cannot obtain or use those prints, military members and family members stationed abroad can submit fingerprints electronically to USCIS through a mobile fingerprint unit, where available.  Contact your local USCIS office or U.S. consulate for mobile fingerprint unit availability.  If a mobile fingerprint unit is not available, you may submit 2 properly completed FD-258 Fingerprint Cards taken by the Military Police, Department of Homeland Security officials or U.S. Embassy or Consulate officials. 

Mail the FD-258 cards to:
USCIS Nebraska Service Center
PO Box 87426
Lincoln NE 68501-7426

QCI LAW PARTNER SHERROD SEWARD NOMINATED FOR TOP 100 UNDER 40  MOST INFLUENTIAL PERSONS OF AFRICAN DECENT

Queen City Immigration Law                      

222 S. Church St #100

Charlotte, NC 28205

704-500-2075

info@qcilaw.com


QCI LAW PARTNER SHERROD SEWARD NOMINATED FOR TOP 100 UNDER 40  MOST INFLUENTIAL PERSONS OF AFRICAN DECENT

CHARLOTTE, NC – Queen City Immigration Law (QCI Law), a Charlotte based full service immigration law firm, is pleased to announce that Partner Sherrod Seward, Esq. is nominated as one of the top 100 Under 40 Most Influential People of African Descent by the United Nations’ International Decade for People of African Descent Organization.

In support of the International Decade for People of African Descent, proclaimed by United Nations’ General Assembly resolution 68/237 and to be observed from 2015 to 2024, the Most Influential People of African Descent (MIPAD) identifies high achievers of African descent in public and private sectors from all around the world as a progressive network of relevant actors to join together in the spirit of recognition, justice and development of Africa, it's people on the continent and across it's Diaspora.

“‘I am typically uncomfortable when it comes to receiving recognition” Says Sherrod Seward. “However, this is wonderful news. I’m honored that someone out there understands what we are putting together over at Queen City Immigration Law”

As the emerging market business development leader at Queen City Immigration Law, Sherrod Seward spent much of 2017 educating business owners from the African Diaspora about how to eliminate trade barriers through immigration incentives. Sherrod’s efforts included modering panels, writing articles, and advocating to private and government partners.

Immigration is an underappreciated incentive to global business development, with small to medium sized enterprises. In truth, foreign business partners in emerging markets often do not know of the immigration opportunities available for business people. Queen City Immigration Law will continue advocating for business leaders in emerging markets in 2018 and beyond. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact our office at 704-500-2075 or email info@qcilaw.com.

About Sherrod Seward

Sherrod Seward is an experienced lawyer with a passion for entertainment, investment, and employment-based immigration law and international business in emerging markets. In addition, he has an extensive background in global risk mitigation as a broker with the Export-Import Bank of the United States. The same cultured approach Sherrod brings to Queen City Immigration Law,  he also applies to his extreme love for all things Cleveland and MMA (Mixed Martial Arts including www.combatsportsvisas.com). Sherrod began his legal career at Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Cleveland, Ohio and did his undergrad at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia. Since obtaining his Juris Doctor, Sherrod has become more intentional than ever to be an advocate for clients in need of international legal assistance.

CombatSportsVisas.com presents the 2018 Promoter's Package

Promoter's Kit - For Combat Sports (1).png

Queen City Immigration Law

222 S. Church St

Suite 100

Charlotte, North Carolina 28202

Tel:     704.500.2075

Web:    www.combatsportsvisas.com

Email:    combatsportsvisas@qcilaw.com

 

29th December 2017

 

For Immediate Release

With great excitement and optimism, we are proud to announce that Queen City Immigration Law's Combat Sports Practice presents the 2018 Promoter's Package for P visas. For the past 27 years, P and O visas have given foreigners within the entertainment and athletic industries the opportunity to provide their services within the United States. Now, Queen City Immigration Law (QCIL), will provide unique and tailored services just for promoters of combat sport related events to hire talent from all over the world. 

“Combat Sports is consistently one of the most active sports that requires participation from all over the world,” partner, Sherrod Seward says. “having a background in the business of combat sports gives me a unique perspective on how to be helpful to promotions.”

Partner, Sherrod Seward, has been involved with combat sports since matriculating in Law School and has made it his mission to be a resource for the combat sports industry.  Sherrod leads our entertainment and cultural based visa group and has performed research on MMA broadcasting agreements, performed business development for top regional promotions, and assisted in the management of some of the world’s best fighters.

The Combat Sports Promotion Package is a program that allows QCIL to integrate seamlessly with combat sports related organizations in a manner that increases efficiency and reduces costs. 

Program Deliverables

1. Combat Sports Promotions receive discount pricing for P visas that decreases with volume of applications

2. Complimentary review of your talent contracts for USCIS optimization and receive helpful templates for processing

3. We will build an online portal for your matchmaker to present athletes and manage/monitor visa progress

4.  Monthly availability for complimentary consultations for promotion and athletes regarding P visas

Try the Online Platform!

Visit this link - www.qcilaw.com/yourpromotion

Password: testing

Promoter's Kit - For Combat Sports.png

For more information about how the Promoter Package can help you and your organization to obtain P visas, please contact us at 704-500-2075 or via email at combatsportsvisas@qcilaw.com.

Waivers Are Available for E, L, and P visas.

download (10).jpg

Currently, Queen City Immigration Law is spreading the word about the usefulness of business and investment visas to emerging market communities. Visas in the E and L category are far less expensive than the EB-5 investment visas. One common question is, whether persons that have overstayed their visa status in the United States can take advantage of these visas. The answer is: it is possible, but very risky. 

The only way to have a nonimmigrant visa based on employment or investment is to leave the United States and acquire the visa from a consular office. A three (3) year overstay on a visa will trigger a ten (10) year bar from reentering the United States once the foreign national departs.

There are nonimmigrant visa waivers available for these circumstances such as the I-601 waiver. Additionally,  the foreign national would need to go through the normal process for applying for an L or E visa to have an opportunity to submit a waiver requests. Once the foreign national reaches the consular processing step (done in their home country after the visa application is filed online, generally after an approved petition), the foreign national will be deemed inadmissible based on the overstay in the United States and his case will be denied. 

At that point, the consular officer will provide the foreign national with the available options for filing a waiver under section 212 of the INA. These waivers require the submission of a legal brief to prove the case. The consular officers are looking for the gravity of the offense, the risk of harm in admitting the applicant back into the United States, and the importance of the applicant's reason for entering. Decisions are determined on a case by case basis, and the reviewing officer has discretion. Generally speaking, these waivers are not easy. That being said, waivers for nonimmigrant visas are usually easier to obtain than immigrant visas. Keep in mind, they will be temporary (for admission of up to five (5) years). They will not allow for adjustments of status to obtain a green card unless a separate waiver is submitted for that case upon filing it. 

Once the waiver is submitted and reviewed, the applicant will be called for an interview at the consulate and a decision will be made. Unfortunately, the applicant will have to leave the US in order to complete this process. Although the foreign national may be eligible for a provisional unlawful presence waiver (which can be filed in the United States while foreign national is there) the foreign national will still need to leave the United States to attend the interview at the consular office. The risk of  leaving to proceed with this process is that, if denied, he will be barred from returning for ten (10) years. 

If you are out of status but considering applying for a business or investment based visa, call Queen City Immigration Law at 704-500-2075  and schedule a consultation.

Business Visas for Emerging Markets - Cleveland, OH - December 6

Business Visas Event Flyer (1).png

Cleveland, OH - Business Visas Seminar - December 6 - 5:00

SPACES & CO

1536 St Clair Ave NE

Cleveland, OH 44114

 

Cost: $20

 

WHAT IS THE BIG DEAL?

Many emerging market countries in Africa and the Middle East are eligible for E-1, E-2, and L-1 Visas, and BARELY TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT!

 

Meanwhile,  nations such as Japan and Germany, take advantage of these visas by the thousands to set up businesses in the United States. These businesses then reinvest back into their home countries.

WHAT IS THE SOLUTION?

Our Law firm is reaching out directly to  companies  and entrepreneurs from emerging markets to educate them about the benefits and process of obtaining E and L category visas.

HERE ARE THE FACTS.

1. Immigration as an incentive for international development

2. Eligibility for E-1 Trader and E-2 in emerging markets  

3. Why emerging markets are not using business and investment visas

 

SEMINAR

Queen City Immigration Law Partner, Sherrod Seward, will be hosting a seminar in conjunction with our Cleveland, OH offices on Tuesday, December 6th. This seminar will detail the eligibility and requirements for the E-1, E-2, and L visa categories. Sherrod will also discuss how these visas can be used to encourage economic trade back to emerging markets.

Over the past five years,  foreign business people been using investment and employment based visa solutions to do  business in the United States more than ever before. This trend did not propagate in emerging markets such as Africa, the Middle-East, and the Caribbean. Immigration is often a significant incentive to foreign businesses looking to provide direct investment into the United States.

The world’s most powerful and innovative countries take full advantage of the visas available for employment and investment.  Countries in Africa and the Caribbean are far behind in the number of applications for these visas. One primary reason is that many emerging market countries are not eligible to apply for E category visas due to the various requirements of a U.S. Treaty authorization. However, even in countries that do have treaties with the United States for the E category visas, this opportunity is not always taken advantage of.  

What are the incentives for the Foreign Business Owners taking advantage of business and investment visas? 

1.    Less red-tape for traveling to the United States – Visitor visas have a lot of limitations and are becoming more difficult to obtain, especially in emerging markets.

2.    Work Authorization – Visitor visas do not permit a foreigner to legally work in the United States. The L visa comes with a work authorization while the family members of an E visa holder can obtain work authorization.

3.    Period of Stay – Visitor visas usually only authorize 6 months of visitation at a time and the foreigner can risk losing the visa if they stay in the States too long. Both the L and E visa permit lengthy periods of stay for foreign nationals.

4.    Legal Permanent Residence – There are direct and indirect avenues for foreign nationals to obtain Legal Permanent Residence (“Green Card”) through the L and E visa programs.

5.    Education – Many foreigners invest copious amounts of money to facilitate their children being able to receive an education in the United States.

 6.    Access to Finance – In many cases, it is easier for a foreign business to receive more affordable financing through an entity domesticated in the United States rather than their location in the home country.

7.    Transfer Workers – Both the L and E-1 visa have features that allow for the transfer of employees which facilitates business growth and training.

Why Business People in Emerging Markets may not be taking advantage of investment and employment based visas?

1. Lack of Knowledge - Most business people in emerging markets are generally unaware of these visas. Queen City Immigration Law is dedicated to the mission of educating the underserved market about global business solutions through E and L visa categories.

2. Repatriation of Funds - In many countries, there are governmental hurdles to getting USD out of the country. For example, Ethiopia has government regulations to control the flow of USD out of the country due to an effort to curtail inflation of its own currency. These barriers are not always fatal to success as there are private lenders in the market for assisting in these situations. We may be able to introduce you to a lender.

3. Source of Funds - For investment based visas, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service has strict guidelines about getting comfortable with the SOURCE of the funds used to make the investment. In emerging markets, a lack of records and transparency are fatal to investment deals because USCIS cannot verify the source of the investment.

4, Corruption - Issues at the consular offices have also been blamed for lack of knowledge about immigration solutions. These issues are commonly government officials creating barriers to complete the application process such as charging miscellaneous fees to provide documentation the petitioner needs for their applications.

Business Visa Seminar - Columbus Ohio - November 29, 2017

Business Visas Event Flyer (3).png

Columbus, OH - Business Visas Seminar - Nov. 29 - 5:00

Hedgemon Seniors

2399 Mock Rd

Columbus, OH 43219

Cost: $20

 

WHAT IS THE BIG DEAL?

Many emerging market countries in Africa and the Middle East are eligible for E-1, E-2, and L-1 Visas, and BARELY TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT!

Meanwhile,  nations such as Japan and Germany, take advantage of these visas by the thousands to set up businesses in the United States. These businesses then reinvest back into their home countries.

WHAT IS THE SOLUTION?

Our Law firm is reaching out directly to  companies  and entrepreneurs from emerging markets to educate them about the benefits and process of obtaining E and L category visas.

HERE ARE THE FACTS.

1. Immigration as an incentive for international development

2. Eligibility for E-1 Trader and E-2 in emerging markets  

3. Why emerging markets are not using business and investment visas

 

SEMINAR

Queen City Immigration Law Partner, Sherrod Seward, will be hosting a seminar in conjunction with our Columbus, OH offices on Wednesday, November 29th. This seminar will detail the eligibility and requirements for the E-1, E-2, and L visa categories. Sherrod will also discuss how these visas can be used to encourage economic trade back to emerging markets.

Over the past five years,  foreign business people been using investment and employment based visa solutions to do  business in the United States more than ever before. This trend did not propagate in emerging markets such as Africa, the Middle-East, and the Caribbean. Immigration is often a significant incentive to foreign businesses looking to provide direct investment into the United States.

The world’s most powerful and innovative countries take full advantage of the visas available for employment and investment.  Countries in Africa and the Caribbean are far behind in the number of applications for these visas. One primary reason is that many emerging market countries are not eligible to apply for E category visas due to the various requirements of a U.S. Treaty authorization. However, even in countries that do have treaties with the United States for the E category visas, this opportunity is not always taken advantage of.

 

What are the incentives for the Foreign Business Owners taking advantage of business and investment visas?

 

1.    Less red-tape for traveling to the United States – Visitor visas have a lot of limitations and are becoming more difficult to obtain, especially in emerging markets.

 

2.    Work Authorization – Visitor visas do not permit a foreigner to legally work in the United States. The L visa comes with a work authorization while the family members of an E visa holder can obtain work authorization.

 

3.    Period of Stay – Visitor visas usually only authorize 6 months of visitation at a time and the foreigner can risk losing the visa if they stay in the States too long. Both the L and E visa permit lengthy periods of stay for foreign nationals.

 

4.    Legal Permanent Residence – There are direct and indirect avenues for foreign nationals to obtain Legal Permanent Residence (“Green Card”) through the L and E visa programs.

 

5.    Education – Many foreigners invest copious amounts of money to facilitate their children being able to receive an education in the United States.

 

6.    Access to Finance – In many cases, it is easier for a foreign business to receive more affordable financing through an entity domesticated in the United States rather than their location in the home country.

 

7.    Transfer Workers – Both the L and E-1 visa have features that allow for the transfer of employees which facilitates business growth and training.

  

Why Business People in Emerging Markets may not be taking advantage of investment and employment based visas?

 

1. Lack of Knowledge - Most business people in emerging markets are generally unaware of these visas. Queen City Immigration Law is dedicated to the mission of educating the underserved market about global business solutions through E and L visa categories.

2. Repatriation of Funds - In many countries, there are governmental hurdles to getting USD out of the country. For example, Ethiopia has government regulations to control the flow of USD out of the country due to an effort to curtail inflation of its own currency. These barriers are not always fatal to success as there are private lenders in the market for assisting in these situations. We may be able to introduce you to a lender.

3. Source of Funds - For investment based visas, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service has strict guidelines about getting comfortable with the SOURCE of the funds used to make the investment. In emerging markets, a lack of records and transparency are fatal to investment deals because USCIS cannot verify the source of the investment.

4. Corruption - Issues at the consular offices have also been blamed for lack of knowledge about immigration solutions. These issues are commonly government officials creating barriers to complete the application process such as charging miscellaneous fees to provide documentation the petitioner needs for their applications.

P Visas that last for Athletes and Entertainers

QCI Law - Press Kit - For Combat Sports.png

Many of the best performers and athletes in the world are not from the United States, but in order for them to work in the US it is some necessary legal steps because the consequences are steep. Also, with proper preparation,  P visa benefits can last for years. 

 Queen City Immigration Law is an immigration based law firm set to help ease the process for you and your athletes. Our job is to take the stress of obtaining a p visa away and allow managers and athletes time to focus on more important things such as obtaining sponsorship, training and winning competitions! 

Our law firm focuses on the strategic needs of artists, actors, performers, and entertainment professionals all over the world. Our firm specializes in purposeful, intelligent and thorough representation in P and O visa categories.  In case you are unfamiliar, P & O visas are necessary for foreign performers and athletes who are being compensated to perform in the United States.

One of the main reasons a P visa can be stressful is the cost for obtaining one. That’s where we want to help the most with our P Visa Challenge.

THE CHALLENGE IS SIMPLE

We challenge our first time clients to try CrowdJustice to raise money for their P visa application and if they are unsuccessful in obtaining their goal, we will service their next two P visa applications at 50% of our legal fees.

What  is CrowdJustice?

CrowdJustice is a crowdfunding platform uniquely tailored for legal projects and is represents valuable tool that will help build a strong set of resources for many of our clients' visa cases.

Follow the steps below to get started today:

1. Register with CrowdJustice: Applying the crowdfunding model to the law is an ideal solution for clients who have a story to tell and need resources to assert their rights and/or seek legal relief. This is especially true for entertainment clients that have a fan base and/or sponsors. Here is the link https://www.crowdjustice.com/get-started/

2. Accept the P Visa Challenge https://www.qcilaw.com/pvisachallenge

We challenge our first-time clients to try CrowdJustice to raise money for their P visa application and if they are unsuccessful in obtaining their goal, we will service their next P visa application at 50% off our legal fees.

All our clients have to do to get started with the QCI Law P Visa Challenge is to visit www.qcilaw.com/pvisachallenge and click accept challenge.

Managers & Promoters: P visas CAN last for years!

http://www.qcilaw.com/entertainment-blog/2017/9/23/getting-the-most-out-of-your-p-visa

Pictures from QCI Law & Bridgehouse Open House Celebration

On Wednesday, October 25, 2017, Queen City Immigration Law and BridgehouseLaw hosted a successful open house at their conference center located at Tryon Plaza to celebrate a new partnership between the firms. The open house was well attended by guest including representatives from numerous organizations.

The evening served as a finale to the Energizing Africa through Partnerships Conference and the launch of the initiative to market business and investment based visas to business leaders in emerging markets.